Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Toni Award

Wednesday Advertising Day.

For a long time I have been thinking that these wide smiling girls were an indication of Lou Fine drawing a comic strip ad. But lately I have been finding some outside of the period that Fine was actually working in advertising. Anyway, this one from 1948 does fit the boll. Click the link to compare it to Fine's other advertising work to see for yourself.

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Sock It To 'Em

Tuesday Comic Strip Day.

When Tony DiPreta first took over Joe Palooka from Moe Leff (whio had started out as Ham Fisher's assistant and had taken over the strip in the early fifties), he showed much more of his own unique style. I like these early years (but not enough to set aside the time to scan the long run I have - mainly because I am already scanning four other strips from that aprticular paper and want to get on with it). But here are a couple of stray ones, I came across.

Monday, September 18, 2017

Five Pretty Ladies And A Couple Of Stupid Guys

Monday Cartoon Day.

Some very early cartoons by George Crenshaw, before he was influenced by Hank Ketcham (for whom he ended up working years later). Only in the last ones you can see the artist he would become.

Sunday, September 17, 2017

Tropical Dreams

Sunday Meskin Measures.

Today's Mort Meskin story from Black Magic #18 looks a bit different than usually. Maybe the island location stopped him from doing his usual 'man in the city' shots. But I also see the first traces of his move to a more sophisticated style, maybe brought on by his forst efforts to find work at DC. I don't know if he did some of the inking himself. I could also be that he pencilled more detailed than normal and had George Roussos handle the inking.

Saturday, September 16, 2017

A Hell Of A Story

Saturday Leftover Day.

Continuing my run of fun horror stories from the Stan Lee edited Timely/Atlas books in the early fifties, here is another masterpiece by one of my favorite artists. I have collected as many of Jerry Robinson's stories for Stan Lee as I can. Looking back on them, they are pretty neat. But we don't see how many years ahead of the crowd he was, because many of his innovations were taken aboard by the next generation of artists (many of which took his evening classes in comic book art). This story, like the ones I showed last week, has a couple of features that make it a candidate to have been written by Stan Lee. First of all there is the fact that Jerry Robinson does not seem to have written any of his own assignments. He often worked with Stan Lee, who only chose the best storytellers for his contributions. Secondly, there is the use of 'thru' instead of 'thru', which despite my having mentioned it two times in two weeks, is actually a very rare this. Stan was not the only writer doing that, but he was also the only one never to NOT do it. Secondly, again we have a seven page story, where Stan only gave other writers six. And it uses the devil, which is one of Stan's favorite and most used character in all his horror stories. Sadly, like last week, I could not find a 'paper trail' of job numbers clinching the attribution.

Friday, September 15, 2017

I Kid You Not

Friday Comic Book Day.

Last week I showed twp stories from Timely/Atlas' Adventures Into Weird Worlds #13 and #15. Today and tomorrow I want to show you two short stories from the same issues. Both have an overworked inking style, that made me think the famous stilted inker Matthew Fox was involved. But then I remembered that John Romita had said in several interviews that for a short period in 1952/1953 Stan (or his uncle/publisher Martin Goodman) had fallen in love with the line heavy inking style he had tried on one of the war stories and insisted he'd use it for everything (which took him twice as much time). Maybe Stan asked others to work in that style as well. Here is a short story by John Romita in that style. The second one is by Myron Fass. I wondered if it could have been inked by Matthew Fox. Fass worked in a variety of styles and I suspect he did not always do his own inking. Still, it could be Fass himself putting in a little extra work at Stan's request. The first story is written and signed by Stan Lee. The Fass story has 'through' instead of 'thru' so it can't be (see the explanation last week). Both stories have an intro that was probably written by Stan. he started the practice late in 1952 and continued it into his mostly selfwritten run of Menace. These EC style introductions are one of the first instances of the Stan Lee persona coming though - or thru, if you like. Both stories are part of my 'coics can be fun' run of this month.


Thursday, September 14, 2017

Oh What A Lovely War Strip

I keep finding more Sundays of Dan Flagg I haven't shared. I have added them to the previous lot again, because they belong together for reading pleasure.